Traditional recipes

Import Restrictions on Cuban Rum and Cigars Finally Lifted

Import Restrictions on Cuban Rum and Cigars Finally Lifted

President Obama lifts the remaining import restrictions on Cuban goods, including rum and cigars

Unfortunately, the “cool factor” of illegally smoking a Cuban cigar has now gone out the window.

Ever since President Obama lifted the Cuban embargo earlier this year, the borders have been opened and Cuban products have begun to freely flow between the island nation and America.The last remnants of the trade embargo were erased today when Obama finally lifted the remaining import restrictions on Cuban rum and cigars.

Diplomatic relations with Cuba were restored in December 2014, and since then, bit by bit, American-Cuban trade and travel relations have resumed, nearly 54 years since the failed Cuban Missile Crisis. Now, American visitors are not limited (beyond normal TSA rules and regulations) as to how much tobacco and alcohol they can bring home from Cuba. Previously, rum and cigar purchases had been limited to $100 worth of goods.

“You can now celebrate with Cuban rum and Cuban cigars,” said Susan Rice, U.S. national security adviser, as she laid out the new rules in a policy speech to a Washington, D.C. think tank, according to France24.

However, Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry said diplomatic relations with Cuba remained far from perfect, citing human rights violations in Havana as an example.


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Finally, You Can Bring Cuban Cigars and Rum Home From Anywhere

Time to book flights to Canada. As of this morning, cigar and rum lovers long plagued by the Cuban embargo can now bring back cigars from any foreign country for personal use.

RELATED: Cuba at 4,000 Revolutions per Minute

The Obama administration’s permission of Cuban products has been a slow but progressive rollback. Earlier this year it was legal to bring back just $100 worth of Cuban cigars, and only if you were bringing them back directly from Cuba. 2016 also saw the legalization of Americans enjoying Cubans in foreign countries (apparently until now, Americans couldn’t even enjoy one while in another country — oops).

Now it’s as if the flood gates have been opened. While the embargo still officially stands, Americans visiting any country where Cuban products are sold can now bring back a technically unlimited amount of cigars or rum, as long as it is for personal use.

RELATED: The Best Way to Spend $100 on Cigars in Cuba

Personal use is a purposefully ambiguous word choice, so be smart. With a few boxes of different products you might look like you’re stocking up for the winter. With five boxes of the same thing you may raise a red flag or two over intent to sell. But unless your weekender bag looks like it was previously owned by Winston Churchill, you should be fine bringing back whatever your heart desires.

The one remaining caveat: You’ve got to leave the country to get Cubans. Importing them via parcel service and ordering them online both remain technically illegal. We know heading out of the country is a hassle, but a few hundred in round-trip airfare to Canada is still a lot cheaper than tens of thousands of dollars in fines you’re liable for if you get caught by Customs and Border Patrol.

And you’d better get comfortable with this system, since it’s still unclear if we’ll see Cubans sold legally in the U.S. in our lifetimes. Recent FDA regulations have (depending on who’s doing the interpretation) basically made it impossible for Cuban cigars to ever be sold within the United States, even if the embargo is fully lifted. But we expect that there are one or two people in Washington who can find a loophole.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!


Watch the video: web tv Άρης Κωνσταντινίδης Πούρα made by Kria Brysh (October 2021).